State House

2017 Priority Reform Bills

ODA top priorities

HB 203-FN-A  establishes an independent redistricting commission to draw unbiased election district boundaries for all state and federal offices. Committee: Election Law. Prime sponsor: Rep. Cote, Hills. 31. Defeated in House, 190-164.

HB 519  establishes a bipartisan commission to study the feasibility of implementing a clearinghouse model for tracking political expenditures and contributions in real time (as they occur). Committee: Election Law. Prime sponsor: Rep. Higgins, Graf. 12. Our testimony and talking points. Defeated in House, 192-158.

HB 533  closes the loophole that has allowed independent spending groups to avoid registering with the Secretary of State and filing expenditure reports. Committee: Election Law. Prime sponsor: Rep. Smith, Straf. 6. retained in House Election Law Committee.

HB 537  closes the loophole that allows candidates to accept individual donations of up to $5,000 before they publically declare for office. Committee: Election Law. Prime sponsor: Rep. Porter, Hills. 1. Defeated in Senate on voice vote.

SB 33  closes the loophole that allows independent spending groups to avoid registering with the Secretary of State and filing expenditure reports. SB 33 is the Senate version of HB 533 (see above). Committee: Election Law and Internal Affairs. Prime sponsor: Sen. Bradley. Passed Senate, 14-9. Currently in House Election Law Committee.
     
Why SB 33 is needed
      Key definitions in the bill

SB 197
calls for an appropriation to the Department of Justice of $500,000 over two years to enforce election and lobbying laws. Committee: Finance. Prime sponsor: Sen. Feltes. Passed Senate, 23-0, but amendment reduced appropriation to $200,000 over two years. Currently in House Finance Committee (Division 1).

Other bills and LSRs of interest

HB 116  calls for legislative hearings to assess the consequences of the Citizens United decision and evaluate proposals to amend the U.S. Constitution in the wake of that ruling. The bill also calls upon New Hampshire's congressional delegation to support such an amendment. Committee: Election Law. Prime sponsor: Rep. Elliot, Rock. 8. Defeated in House, 193-165.

HB 320  calls for use of a computer model to draw unbiased state and federal election district boundaries. Redistricting criteria would be limited to district population size and compactness. Committee: Election Law. Prime sponsor: Rep. Knirk, Carr. 3. Our testimony and Rep. Jerry Knirk's letter. Defeated in House, 184-161.

HR 7  calls on Congress to consider a constitutional amendment prohibiting campaign contributions unless the donor is eligible to vote in that federal election. Committee: State-Federal Relations and Veterans Affairs. Prime Sponsor: Rep. McConnell, Ches. 12. Talking points and frequently asked questions. House passed, 211-75.

SB 32  adds civil penalties for violating the requirements for signature, identification, and authorization of political advertising. Committee: Election Law and Internal Affairs. Prime Sponsor: Sen. Birdsell. Defeated in House on voice vote.

SB 47  empowers the Secretary of State, rather than the Attorney General, to investigate potential violations of election law, institute enforcement proceedings, and impose penalties for violations. Committee: Election Law and Internal Affairs. Prime Sponsor: Sen. Carson. Rereferred to Senate Election Law and Internal Affairs Committee.

SB 107  establishes an independent redistricting commission. This bill is similar to HB 203 (see above). There are differences in several areas, including, among others, method for choosing commission members, funding, and transparency of the redistricting process. Committee: Election Law and Internal Affairs. Prime Sponsor: Sen. Lasky. Defeated in Senate, 14-9.

SB 115  attributes campaign donations from a limited liability company to the company's members, effectively preventing donors from using LLCs to get around donation limits. Committee: Election Law and Internal Affairs. Prime Sponsor: Sen. Feltes. Defeated in Senate, 14-9.

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  • published this page 2017-02-13 18:10:20 -0500